NSF-61 Requirements

Click on your state to see the requirements.

  • Alaska 18 AAC 80.030. Chemical additives and materials.

    (b) Only the following materials may be used in contact with drinking water in a public
    water system:
    (1) material that is certified for the particular drinking water contact application
    under
    (A) NSF/ANSI Standard 53: Drinking Water Treatment Units – Health
    Effects, adopted by reference in 18 AAC 80.010(b);
    (B) NSF/ANSI Standard 61: Drinking Water System Components –
    Health Effects, including the Addendum to NSF/ANSI Standard 61, both adopted by reference in 18 AAC 80.010(b);

  • Arizona R18-4-213. Standards for Additives, Materials, and Equipment

    B. Except as identified in subsections (D) and (E), a material or product installed after January 1, 1993, that comes into contact with water or a water treatment chemical shall conform to
    ANSI/NSF Standard 61. Products and materials covered bythis subsection include but are not limited to:
    1. Process media, such as carbon and sand;
    2. Joining and sealing materials, such as solvents, cements,
    welding materials, and gaskets;
    3. Lubricants;
    4. Pipes and related products, such as tanks and fittings;
    5. Mechanical devices used in treatment, transmission, or distribution systems such as valves, chlorinators, and separation membranes; and
    6. Surface coatings and paints.

  • Arkansas PWS Reg. VII.F Approved Chemicals, Materials, Equipment, and Processes

    F. All chemicals added to the water and all materials in contact with in-process or treated water shall be certified as being in compliance with ANSI/NSF Standards 60 and 61, as applicable, and as specified in the “Arkansas Department of Health Policy on Certification of Drinking Water Additives”. Certification shall be made by an independent agency meeting the criteria specified in the “Arkansas Department of Health Policy on Certification of Drinking Water Additives”. Self-certification by the manufacturer will not be accepted.
    All unit processes, equipment, chemicals and appurtenances shall be in accordance
    with the latest edition of the applicable AWWA standards, and approved by the Arkansas Department of Health. For treatment facilities utilized for treating water solely for bottled water, at its discretion, the Department may allow certification with the equivalent U.S. Food and Drug Administration food contact or food additive standard in lieu of certification with the appropriate ANSI/NSF 60/61 and AWWA standards.

  • California CCR Title 22: 64590/64591:

    (a) Except as provided in Section 64593 or where a more stringent statutory requirement exists, after March 9, 2008, a water system shall not use any chemical, material, lubricant, or product in the production, treatment or distribution of drinking water that will result in its contact with the drinking water including process media (carbon, sand), protective materials (coatings, linings, liners), joining and sealing materials (solvent cements, welding materials, gaskets, lubricating oils), pipes and related products (pipes, tanks, fittings), and mechanical devices used in treatment/transmission/distribution systems (valves, chlorinators, separation membranes) that has not been tested and certified as meeting the specifications of NSF International/American National Standard Institute (NSF/ANSI) 61-2005 / Addendum 1.0-2005 (Drinking Water System Components -Health Effects), which is hereby incorporated by reference. This requirement shall be met under testing conducted by a product certification organization accredited for this purpose by the American National Standards Institute.

  • Delaware PWS Reg. 2.11 Plans and Specifications:

    2.11.1 No person shall construct a new PWS or alter an existing
    PWS without a Certificate of Approval for Construction.
    2.11.1.1 Systems shall submit two (2) copies of plans and specifications. Plans shall be developed using Construction Plans and Specifications Submittal and Review Guidelines, (Copies are available from the Office of Drinking Water), utilizing the latest edition of Ten States Standards, NSF Standards, AWWA Standards, or approved equivalent and other technical information as required by the Division.

  • Florida 62-555.320 Design and Construction of Public Water Systems.

    (b) Newly installed or constructed public water system (PWS) components that come into contact with drinking water or drinking water treatment chemicals shall conform to the applicable standards, regulations, or requirements referenced in subparagraphs 1. through 3., below. Fire hydrants are not covered by this paragraph; and mechanical devices that were previously installed in a PWS and then are removed, repaired or refurbished, and reinstalled in the same PWS are not covered by this paragraph. In addition, this paragraph does not apply to PWS components that either come into contact with drinking water prior to its treatment by reverse osmosis or come into contact with drinking water treatment chemicals and that are installed or constructed under a construction permit for which the Department received a complete application before August 28, 2003.
    1. Except for ion-exchange resins, precast or cast-in-place concrete structures, and cement mortar, which are addressed in subparagraphs 2. and 3., below, newly installed or constructed PWS components that come into contact with drinking water or drinking water treatment chemicals shall conform to one of the following:
    a. NSF International Standard 61 as adopted in Rule 62-555.335, F.A.C.,
    b. NSF International Standard 42, 44, 53, 55, 58, or 62 as adopted in Rule 62-555.335, F.A.C.,
    c. Section 6 of NSF International Standard 14 as adopted in Rule 62-555.335, F.A.C., or
    d. The Food and Drug Administration’s regulations for indirect food additives as contained in the April 1, 2002, revision of 21.

  • Georgia 391-3-5 Rules for Safe Drinking Water

    (7) Treatment Products and Materials. Products added directly to drinking water for its treatment or introduced indirectly into drinking water through its contact with surfaces of materials or products used for its treatment, storage, transmission, or distribution shall not adversely affect drinking water quality and public health.

    (a) All treatment chemicals that come into contact with drinking water shall be certified for conformance with American National Standards Institute/National Sanitation Foundation Standard 60 (ANSI/NSF Standard 60) by an American National Standards Institute (ANSI) approved third-party certification program or laboratory.

    (b) All products that come into contact with drinking water during its treatment, storage, transmission or distribution shall be certified for conformance with American National Standards Institute/ National Sanitation Foundation Standard 61 (ANSI/NSF Standard 61) by an American National Standards Institute (ANSI) approved third-party certification program or laboratory.

  • Idaho 501. FACILITY AND DESIGN STANDARDS: GENERAL DESIGN REQUIREMENTS FOR PUBLIC DRINKING WATER SYSTEMS.

    Unless otherwise specified by the Department, the design of new drinking water systems, or modifications to existing, public drinking water systems, shall be in conformance with the facility and design standards set forth in Sections 006 and 500 through 552 of these rules. The following general design requirements shall apply as applicable for the type of water system and the treatment or other processes employed.

    Materials Used in Construction. Products that are used to construct public drinking water systems and have water contact surfaces shall conform to applicable AWWA standards and be certified by an accredited ANSI certification body to meet applicable ANSI/NSF standards, where products meeting such AWWA and ANSI/NSF standards exist. In the absence of such products, products meeting applicable product standards and acceptable to the reviewing authority may be selected. Corrosion control shall be taken into account during all aspects of public water system design.

  • Illinois Policy Statement on Bag and Cartridge Filters for Public Water Supplies

    Predesign/Design

    1. The filter housing and bag/cartridge filter must demonstrate a filter efficiency of at least 2-log reduction in particles size 2 micron and above. Demonstration of higher log removals may be required by the reviewing authority depending on raw water quality and other treatment steps to be employed. The reviewing authority will decide whether or not a pilot demonstration is necessary for each installation. This filtration efficiency demonstration may be accomplished by:

    a. Microscopic particulate analysis, including particle counting , sizing and identification, which determines occurrence and removals of micro-organisms and other particle across a filter or system under ambient raw water source condition, or when artificially challenged.

    b. Cryptosporidium particle removal evaluation in accordance with procedures specified in NSF Standard 53 or equivalent. These evaluations must be conducted by NSF or by another third-party whose certification would be acceptable to the reviewing authority.

    c. “Protocol for Equipment Verification Testing for Physical Removal of Microbiological and Particulate Contaminants” procedure specified by the EPA/NSF Environmental Technology Verification Program.
    d. Challenge testing procedure for bag and cartridge filters presented in Chapter 8 of the Long Term 2 Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule Toolbox Guidance Manual.

    e. “Nonconsensus” live Cryptosporidium challenge studies that have been designed and carried out by a third-party agent recognized and accepted by the reviewing authority for interim evaluations. At the present time uniform protocol procedures for live Cryptosporidium challenge studies have not been established.

    f. Methods other than these that are approved by the reviewing authority.

    2. System components such as housing, bags, cartridges, membranes, gaskets, and O-rings should be evaluated under NSF Standard 61 or equivalent, for leaching of contaminants. Additional testing may be required by the reviewing authority.

  • Indiana 327 IAC 8-1-2 Drinking water direct additives and indirect additives; certification requirements

    (c) The following new or modified indirect additives in public water systems shall be certified for conformance to American National Standards Institute (ANSI)/National Sanitation Foundation (NSF) International Standard 61, Drinking Water System Components-Health Effects, except Section 9, Mechanical Plumbing Product:
    (1) All indirect additives found in finished water storage facilities, including lubricants, tank coatings, paints, and epoxies.
    (2) All indirect additives between all entry points to the distribution system and the premises of the consumer.
    (3) All filter and membrane media.
    (4) All indirect additives that are classified in a category of indirect additives for which American National Standards Institute (ANSI)/National Sanitation Foundation (NSF) International Standard 61 is available.
    (d) All public water systems must demonstrate certification of direct additives and indirect additives required by subsections (b) and (c) when inspected by the commissioner.
    (e) Certification that a direct additive or an indirect additive meets the standards adopted in or under this rule shall be recognized as being listed with such certification in one (1) of the following publications:
    (1) “NSF Listings, Drinking Water Treatment Chemicals-Health Effects”.

    327 IAC 8-1-3 Definitions

    (3) “Indirect additives” means additives that are materials or equipment that come in contact with drinking water or come in contact with drinking water direct additives. Examples of indirect additives include the following:
    (A) Pipes.
    (B) Valves and related products.
    (C) Barrier materials.
    (D) Joining and sealing materials.
    (E) Protective materials and related products.
    (F) Mechanical devices used in treatment, transmission, and distribution systems.

  • Iowa Policy Statement on Bag and Cartridge Filters for Public Water Supplies

    Predesign/Design

    1. The filter housing and bag/cartridge filter must demonstrate a filter efficiency of at least 2-log reduction in particles size 2 micron and above. Demonstration of higher log removals may be required by the reviewing authority depending on raw water quality and other treatment steps to be employed. The reviewing authority will decide whether or not a pilot demonstration is necessary for each installation. This filtration efficiency demonstration may be accomplished by:

    a. Microscopic particulate analysis, including particle counting , sizing and identification, which determines occurrence and removals of micro-organisms and other particle across a filter or system under ambient raw water source condition, or when artificially challenged.

    b. Cryptosporidium particle removal evaluation in accordance with procedures specified in NSF Standard 53 or equivalent. These evaluations must be conducted by NSF or by another third-party whose certification would be acceptable to the reviewing authority.

    c. “Protocol for Equipment Verification Testing for Physical Removal of Microbiological and Particulate Contaminants” procedure specified by the EPA/NSF Environmental Technology Verification Program.

    d. Challenge testing procedure for bag and cartridge filters presented in Chapter 8 of the Long Term 2 Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule Toolbox Guidance Manual.

    e. “Nonconsensus” live Cryptosporidium challenge studies that have been designed and carried out by a third-party agent recognized and accepted by the reviewing authority for interim evaluations. At the present time uniform protocol procedures for live Cryptosporidium challenge studies have not been established.

    f. Methods other than these that are approved by the reviewing authority.

    2. System components such as housing, bags, cartridges, membranes, gaskets, and O-rings should be evaluated under NSF Standard 61 or equivalent, for leaching of contaminants. Additional testing may be required by the reviewing authority.

  • Louisiana Title 51 Section 303.F

    F. Water Piping Quality. All potable water pipes, pipe related products and materials that join or seal pipes and pipe related products shall be evaluated and listed as conforming with a national consensus product (or material) standard, ANSI/NSF Standard 61, and NSF/ANSI 372. Any solder or flux used in the installation or repair of any plumbing in a residential or nonresidential facility providing water for human consumption shall be lead free.

  • Maine 10-144-231 Section 7 State of Maine Rules Relating to Drinking Water

    1. NSF/ANSI Standard 61
      1. All materials, products and coatings that contact drinking water installed or applied shall be certified to meet NSF/ANSI Standard 61-2013: Drinking Water System Components – Health Effects. Certification must be granted by an ANSI-Accredited, third-party testing and certification organization.
      2. Exemptions may include the following:
        1. Miscellaneous valves and fittings, three-inch diameter and smaller, may be exempt from this requirement if NSF/ANSI 61 Certified products are not readily
        2. Steel well
        3. Existing stocks of materials. When stocks need to be reordered, the new materials must comply with this section;
        4. A concrete structure, tank, or treatment tank basin constructed onsite that is not normally coated or sealed. If a coating or sealant is specified by the design engineer, the coating or sealant must be certified to comply with ANSI/NSF Standard 61;
        5. An earthen reservoir or canal located upstream of water treatment;
        6. A synthetic tank constructed of material that meets Food and Drug Administration standards for a material that comes into contact with drinking water or aqueous food, or a galvanized steel tank, either of which is:
          1. Less than 15,000 gallons in capacity, and
          2. Used in a public water system with 500 or fewer service connections; or
        7. A pipe, treatment plant component, or water distribution system component made of lead-free stainless steel; and
        8. Any other conditions deemed appropriate by the Department, in accordance with applicable law.
  • Maryland COMAR 26.04.01.33 Quality of Drinking Water in Maryland

    A. For purposes of this regulation, “products” means any:

    1. Chemical or substance added to a public water supply;
    2. Materials used in the manufacture of public water supply components or appurtenances; or
    3. Pipe, storage tank, valve, fixture or other materials which come in contact with water intended for use in public water supply.

    B. Suppliers of water to the community water systems shall receive approval from the Approving Authority before application of coatings and coatings systems to water storage facilities or other water contact surfaces. Suppliers of water shall also submit the analytical results of water that have been collected from newly coated tanks and obtain approval from the Approving Authority before placing these tanks in service.

    C. Suppliers of water shall use only products, as defining in Section A of this regulation, in a public water supply that are acceptable to the Approving Authority. The Approving Authority shall consider the following when determining which products are acceptable for use in a public water supply:

    1. If the product meets the applicable American National Standards Institute (ANSI)/National Sanitation Foundation (NSF) standards for direct or indirect drinking water additives; or
    2. If the product is certified by an organization having a third-party certification program accredited by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) to meet criteria that are at least as stringent as those in Section 1 of this regulation.
  • Massachusetts 310 CMR 22.04(8) Department of Environmental Protection Drinking Water

    (8) New Product or Technology.

    (a) No Supplier of Water shall add, install or use any chemicals, drinking water additives,
    or treatment devices or equipment that come into direct contact with drinking water, unless such devices or equipment have received the prior written approval of the Department.

    (b) To obtain the Department’s approval of a new product (e.g., additives, coatings), a
    manufacturer shall demonstrate that the product:

    1. conforms to the applicable American National Standards Institute (ANSI) and the National Sanitation Foundation (NSF) Standard 60 or 61; or Underwriter Laboratory(UL) standards or the performance of the technology has been verified by the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA’s) Environmental Technology Verification Program (ETV)

  • Michigan MI SDWA 325.1013 Safe Drinking Water Act

    Sec. 13.

    (1) As used in this section, “product” means any chemical or substance added to a public water supply, any materials used in the manufacture of public water supply components or appurtenances, or any pipe, storage tank, valve, fixture, or other materials which come in contact with water intended for use in a public water supply.

    (2) The department may promulgate rules setting standards of quality, composition, safety, or design of products. Until the department promulgates rules setting standards for products, all products that may come in contact with water intended for use in a public water supply shall meet American national standards institute/national sanitation foundation standards, specifically ANSI/NSF standard 60-1988 and ANSI/NSF standard 61-1988 which are hereby incorporated by reference. Adoption of a product standard by rule supersedes the standard incorporated by reference in this section.

    (3) Only products that meet the standards provided for in subsection (2) shall be used by a supplier of water in a public water supply. Certification that a product meets the standards provided for in subsection (2) by a laboratory accredited by American national standards institute to test and certify products shall be prima facie evidence that a product meets the standards. The department shall make a list of products meeting the standards available at no charge.

  • Minnesota Policy Statement on Bag and Cartridge Filters for Public Water Supplies

    Predesign/Design

    1. The filter housing and bag/cartridge filter must demonstrate a filter efficiency of at least 2-log reduction in particles size 2 micron and above. Demonstration of higher log removals may be required by the reviewing authority depending on raw water quality and other treatment steps to be employed. The reviewing authority will decide whether or not a pilot demonstration is necessary for each installation. This filtration efficiency demonstration may be accomplished by:

    a. Microscopic particulate analysis, including particle counting , sizing and identification, which determines occurrence and removals of micro-organisms and other particle across a filter or system under ambient raw water source condition, or when artificially challenged.

    b. Cryptosporidium particle removal evaluation in accordance with procedures specified in NSF Standard 53 or equivalent. These evaluations must be conducted by NSF or by another third-party whose certification would be acceptable to the reviewing authority.

    c. “Protocol for Equipment Verification Testing for Physical Removal of Microbiological and Particulate Contaminants” procedure specified by the EPA/NSF Environmental Technology Verification Program.
    d. Challenge testing procedure for bag and cartridge filters presented in Chapter 8 of the Long Term 2 Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule Toolbox Guidance Manual.

    e. “Nonconsensus” live Cryptosporidium challenge studies that have been designed and carried out by a third-party agent recognized and accepted by the reviewing authority for interim evaluations. At the present time uniform protocol procedures for live Cryptosporidium challenge studies have not been established.

    f. Methods other than these that are approved by the reviewing authority.

    2. System components such as housing, bags, cartridges, membranes, gaskets, and O-rings should be evaluated under NSF Standard 61 or equivalent, for leaching of contaminants. Additional testing may be required by the reviewing authority.

  • Missouri Policy Statement on Bag and Cartridge Filters for Public Water Supplies

    Predesign/Design

    1. The filter housing and bag/cartridge filter must demonstrate a filter efficiency of at least 2-log reduction in particles size 2 micron and above. Demonstration of higher log removals may be required by the reviewing authority depending on raw water quality and other treatment steps to be employed. The reviewing authority will decide whether or not a pilot demonstration is necessary for each installation. This filtration efficiency demonstration may be accomplished by:

    a. Microscopic particulate analysis, including particle counting , sizing and identification, which determines occurrence and removals of micro-organisms and other particle across a filter or system under ambient raw water source condition, or when artificially challenged.

    b. Cryptosporidium particle removal evaluation in accordance with procedures specified in NSF Standard 53 or equivalent. These evaluations must be conducted by NSF or by another third-party whose certification would be acceptable to the reviewing authority.

    c. “Protocol for Equipment Verification Testing for Physical Removal of Microbiological and Particulate Contaminants” procedure specified by the EPA/NSF Environmental Technology Verification Program.
    d. Challenge testing procedure for bag and cartridge filters presented in Chapter 8 of the Long Term 2 Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule Toolbox Guidance Manual.

    e. “Nonconsensus” live Cryptosporidium challenge studies that have been designed and carried out by a third-party agent recognized and accepted by the reviewing authority for interim evaluations. At the present time uniform protocol procedures for live Cryptosporidium challenge studies have not been established.

    f. Methods other than these that are approved by the reviewing authority.

    2. System components such as housing, bags, cartridges, membranes, gaskets, and O-rings should be evaluated under NSF Standard 61 or equivalent, for leaching of contaminants. Additional testing may be required by the reviewing authority.

  • Montana ARM 17.38:101

  • NAC 445A.65825  “Determined to be compatible with drinking water” defined.

    (NRS 445A.860)

    “Determined to be compatible with drinking water” means that a product is determined to be compatible with drinking water through:
    1.  Certification of the product in accordance with Standard 14, 42, 44, 53, 55, 58, 60, 61 or 372, as appropriate, as adopted by reference in NAC 445A.6663; or
    2.  Certification of the product by an independent laboratory approved by the Division or the appropriate district board of health.
    (Added to NAC by Bd. of Health, eff. 2-20-97; A by Environmental Comm’n by R194-08, 10-27-2009; R118-14, 12-22-2014)

  • New Hampshire Env-Ws 305.01 Coatings, Surfaces, and Additives.

    (a) All chemicals added to drinking water and all coatings and surfaces in contact with drinking water shall be tested and certified in accordance with the applicable direct and indirect additives standard numbers 60 and 61 of the American National Standards Institute (ANSI), as indicated in Table 305-1.

  • 7:10-8.2 Drinking water additives

    1. The Department adopts and incorporates by reference the following ANSI/NSF standards, as amended and supplemented. The standards may be obtained from NSF International, 475 Plymouth Road, P.O. Box 130140, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48113-0140.
      1. ANSI/NSF Standard 60, Drinking Water Treatment Chemicals, and
      2. ANSI/NSF Standard 61, Drinking Water System
        1. For the purpose of this subchapter, ANSI/NSF Standard 61 shall apply only to new construction, or the modification or repair of existing facilities.
  • New Mexico WSR 20.7.10.400K

    (K) Direct and indirect additives. A component, material, treatment chemical or other
    substance that may come into contact with drinking water shall be certified by an independent, third-party certifier accredited by ANSI as meeting at a minimum the most recent version of NSF/ANSI standard 60: drinking water treatment chemical-health effects, or NSF/ANSI standard 61: drinking water system components-health effects.

  • New York Policy Statement on Bag and Cartridge Filters for Public Water Supplies

    Predesign/Design

    1. The filter housing and bag/cartridge filter must demonstrate a filter efficiency of at least 2-log reduction in particles size 2 micron and above. Demonstration of higher log removals may be required by the reviewing authority depending on raw water quality and other treatment steps to be employed. The reviewing authority will decide whether or not a pilot demonstration is necessary for each installation. This filtration efficiency demonstration may be accomplished by:a. Microscopic particulate analysis, including particle counting , sizing and identification, which determines occurrence and removals of micro-organisms and other particle across a filter or system under ambient raw water source condition, or when artificially challenged.b. Cryptosporidium particle removal evaluation in accordance with procedures specified in NSF Standard 53 or equivalent. These evaluations must be conducted by NSF or by another third-party whose certification would be acceptable to the reviewing authority.c. “Protocol for Equipment Verification Testing for Physical Removal of Microbiological and Particulate Contaminants” procedure specified by the EPA/NSF Environmental Technology Verification Program.
      d. Challenge testing procedure for bag and cartridge filters presented in Chapter 8 of the Long Term 2 Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule Toolbox Guidance Manual.e. “Nonconsensus” live Cryptosporidium challenge studies that have been designed and carried out by a third-party agent recognized and accepted by the reviewing authority for interim evaluations. At the present time uniform protocol procedures for live Cryptosporidium challenge studies have not been established.f. Methods other than these that are approved by the reviewing authority.
    2. System components such as housing, bags, cartridges, membranes, gaskets, and O-rings should be evaluated under NSF Standard 61 or equivalent, for leaching of contaminants. Additional testing may be required by the reviewing authority.
  • North Carolina 15A NCAC 18C .1537 DRINKING WATER ADDITIVES

    (a) The standards set forth in American National Standards Institute/NSF International, codified at ANSI/NSF Standard 60 and ANSI/NSF Standard 61, are hereby incorporated by reference including any subsequent amendments and editions. Copies are available for public inspection as set forth in Rule .0102 of this Subchapter.

    (b) A water supply product used in a public water system shall meet the standards incorporated by reference in Paragraph (a) of this Rule. A product certified by an organization having a third-party certification program accredited by the American National Standards Institute to test and certify such products is acceptable for use in a public water system.

    (c) A supplier of water shall maintain a list of all water supply products used in a public water system for inspection by the Department. Prior to using a product not previously listed, a supplier of water shall either determine the product is certified as required by Paragraph (b) of this Rule or notify the Department of the type, name and manufacturer of a product.

    (d) A supplier of water shall not introduce or permit the introduction of a water supply product into a public water system which does not meet the requirements of this Rule.

  • North Dakota NDAC 33-17-01-19.4

    4. Products in contact with water. All products that may come into contact with water intended for use in a public water system must meet American national standards institute/national sanitation foundation international standards 60 and 61. Suppliers of water for public water systems may not willfully introduce or permit the introduction of a product into the public water system which has not first been determined to meet these standards. At the discretion of the department, suppliers of water for public water systems shall compile and maintain on file for inspection by the department a list of all products used by the system. Prior to using a product not on the list, suppliers of water for public water systems shall either determine that the product meets appropriate American national standards institute/national sanitation foundation international standards or notify the department of the type, name, and manufacturer of the product. A product will be considered as meeting these standards if so certified by an organization accredited by the American national standards institute to test and certify such products.

  • Ohio OAC 3745-83-01(d)

    (D) Approval of chemicals and components. All chemicals, substances, and materials added to or brought in contact with water in or intended to be used in a public water system or used for the purpose of treating, conditioning, altering, or
    modifying the characteristics of such water shall be shown by either the manufacturer, distributor, or purveyor to be non-toxic and harmless to humans when used in accordance with the formulation and concentration as specified by the manufacturer, and shall be certified as meeting the “American National Standards Institute/National Sanitation Foundation (ANSI/NSF)” standards in paragraphs (D)(1) to (D)(3) of this rule. Certification shall be from an “ANSI” accredited product certification organization.

    1. All chemicals shall be certified as meeting the specification of “ANSI/NSF
      Standard 60 Drinking Water Treatment Chemicals – Health Effects (2009).”
    2. All components installed by a public water system shall be certified as
      meeting the specifications of “ANSI/NSF Standard 61 Drinking Water System
      Components – Health Effects (2010).” If certification to “ANSI/NSF Standard 61” is not available for a component, an alternate component with “ANSI/NSF Standard 61” certification must be used. In cases where no alternate “ANSI/NSF Standard 61” component exists, the director may accept another component on a case by case basis until a “ANSI/NSF Standard 61” certified component is available.
  • Oklahoma 252:626-19-1. General

    (a) Pressure Requirements. Design the distribution system to provide a minimum of 25 psi throughout the distribution system under normal operating conditions including peak demand and fire flows where fire protection is provided.

    (b) Hydraulic analysis. Submit a hydraulic analysis of the system that demonstrates:

    1. a minimum of 25 psi shall be maintained throughout the distribution system during peak demand, and
    2. that flows are calculated at not less than one (1) gallon per minute per service connection.

    (c) Standards. All materials, including piping, fittings, valves, fire hydrants, gaskets, packing and other joint materials shall meet the latest specifications issued by the AWWA, ASTM, ANSI, NSF, or the federal government.

  • Oregon 333-061-0087 Product Acceptability

    (5) Materials and products which come into contact with drinking water supplied by public water systems or which come into contact with drinking water treatment chemicals used by public water systems shall meet the requirements of NSF Standard 61: Drinking Water System Components – Health Effects, NSF/ANSI Standard 372 or equivalent. These materials and products include but are not limited to process media, protective materials, joining and sealing materials, pipes and related products, and mechanical devices used in treatment, transmission, and distribution systems.

  • Pennsylvania § 109.606. Chemicals, materials and equipment.

    (c) Materials used in the construction or modification of a public water system including waterline extensions which may come into contact with or affect the quality of the water and which are certified for conformance with ANSI/NSF Standard 61 (Drinking Water System Components—Health Effects—National Sanitation Foundation) are deemed acceptable to the Department.

  • Rhode Island DWQ 4613 4.1A

    Section 4.0 – Approval of Treatment Works, Storage, and Pumping Facilities

    4.1 No new water treatment works or water storage or pumping facilities shall be constructed or such existing works or facilities substantially altered until design plans and specifications prepared by a professional engineer registered in accordance with Chapter 5-8 of the General Laws of Rhode Island, as amended, and a plan for operation and maintenance have been approved by the Director. The design of water treatment works, water storage, or water pumping facilities should reflect the guidance contained in (Ten State Standards) Recommended Standards for Water Works: Policies for the Review and Approval of Plans and Specifications for Public Water Supplies (most recent edition), where applicable. These facilities shall also be installed and constructed in accordance with applicable American Water Works Association (AWWA) Standards with reference to materials used and construction procedures to be followed. Exceptions from this requirement may be granted by the Director.

    (a) Any chemical or substance added to a public water supply, any materials used in the manufacture of public water supply components or appurtenances, or any pipe, storage tank, valve, fixture, or other materials which come in contact with water intended for use in a public water supply shall meet American National Standards Institute/NSF International standards, specifically ANSI/NSF Standard 60 (most recent edition) and ANSI/NSF Standard 61 (most recent edition) which are hereby adopted by reference.

    Only products which meet the standards adopted in or pursuant to this Section shall be used by a supplier of water in a public water supply. Certification that a product meets the standards adopted pursuant to this Section by an organization having a third-party certification program accredited by American National Standards Institute, the American Association for Laboratory Accreditation, or the International Accreditation Service, Inc. or equivalent to test and certify products shall be prima facie evidence that ta product meets the standards.

    (b) NSF Standards have also been developed for certain Drinking Water Treatment Units. Units meeting these criteria may be considered for approval, if deemed appropriate by the Director.

  • South Carolina R. 61-58.4 D. (1&3)

    1. Distribution Systems.

    (1) Materials Standards – Pipe, fittings, packing, jointing materials, valves and fire hydrants shall conform to Section C of the American Water Works Association (AWWA) Standards. All materials or products which come into contact with drinking water shall be certified as meeting the specifications of the American National Standard Institute/National Sanitation Foundation Standard 61, Drinking Water System Components – Health Effects. The certifying party shall be accredited by the American National 117 R.61-58.4.D Standards Institute. In the absence of American Water Works Association (AWWA) Standards, materials meeting applicable Product Standards and acceptable to the Department may be selected. SD 26 Class 160 and SD 21 Class 200 PVC pipe meeting ASTM Standard D1785 or D2241 are acceptable in sizes twelve (12) inches and smaller. Asbestos cement pipe shall not be used in potable water systems except in the repair of existing asbestos cement lines. Metallic pipe and fittings shall be lead free in accordance with R.61-58.4(F). Thermoplastic pipe shall not be used above grade.

    (3) Gaskets and Joints – Gaskets, O-rings, and other products used for jointing pipes, setting meters or valves, or other appurtenances which will expose the material to the water shall comply with the requirements of R.61-58.4(D)(1) and shall not be made of natural rubber or any other material which will support microbiological growth. Lubricants which will support microbiological growth shall not be used for slip-on joints. The use of vegetable shortening to lubricate joints is prohibited. The use of solventweld PVC pipe and fittings in water mains four (4) inches and larger is prohibited.

  • Tennessee Rule 0400-45-01

    (36) By January 1, 1995, all chemicals, additives, coatings or other materials used in the treatment, conditioning and conveyance of drinking water must have been approved by the National Sanitation Foundation (NSF) or American National Standards Institute (ANSI) certified parties as meeting NSF product standard 60 and 61. Until 1995, products used for treatment, conditioning and conveyance of drinking water shall have been listed as approved by the US EPA or NSF.

  • Texas TAC 29.44

    (a) Design and standards. All potable water distribution systems including pump stations, mains, and both ground and elevated storage tanks, shall be designed, installed, and constructed in accordance with current American Water Works Association (AWWA) standards with reference to materials to be used and construction procedures to be followed. In the absence of AWWA standards, commission review may be based upon the standards of the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM), commercial, and other recognized standards utilized by licensed professional engineers.

    (1) All newly installed pipes and related products must conform to American National Standards Institute/NSF International (ANSI/NSF) Standard 61 and must be certified by an organization accredited by ANSI.

  • Utah R 309-105-10 Operation and Maintenance Procedures

    (2) New and Repaired Mains

    (a) All new water mains shall meet the requirements of R309-550-6 with regard to materials of construction. All products in contact with culinary water shall comply with ANSI/NSF Standard 61.

  • Vermont VWSR Chapter 21 Appendix A 5.2.2

    5.2.2 Specifications

    All products or chemicals which may come in contact with water intended for use in a Public water system shall meet American National Standards Institute/NSF International Standards, specifically ANSI/NSF Standards 60 and 61.

  • Virginia 12 VAC 5-590-1110. Materials.

    Article 6. Water Distribution Systems

    1. The pipe selected shall have been manufactured in conformity with the current available standards issued by the American Water Works Association if such standards exist or be approved by the National Sanitation Foundation for water distribution piping.
    2. In the absence of such standards, pipe meeting applicable commercial standards and acceptable to the division may be considered.
    3. Used water mains that meet these standards may be used again after the pipe has been thoroughly cleaned and restored.
    4. Packing and joint materials used in the joints of pipe shall meet the standards of the American Water Works Association or the National Sanitation Foundation.
  • Washington WAC 246-290-220

    Drinking water materials and additives.

    (1) All materials shall conform to the ANSI/NSF Standard 61 if in substantial contact with potable water supplies. For the purposes of this section, “substantial contact” means the elevated degree that a material in contact with water may release leachable contaminants into the water such that levels of these contaminants may be unacceptable with respect to either public health or aesthetic concerns. It should take into consideration the total material/water interface area of exposure, volume of water exposed, length of time water is in contact with the material, and level of public health risk. Examples of water system components that would be considered to be in “substantial contact” with drinking water are filter media, storage tank interiors or liners, distribution piping, membranes, exchange or adsorption media, or other similar components that would have high potential for contacting the water. Materials associated with components such as valves, pipe fittings, debris screens, gaskets, or similar appurtenances would not be considered to be in substantial contact.

    (2) Materials or additives in use prior to the effective date of these regulations that have not been listed under ANSI/NSF Standard 60 or 61 may be used for their current applications until the materials are scheduled for replacement, or that stocks of existing additives are depleted and scheduled for reorder.

    (3) Any treatment chemicals, with the exception of commercially retailed hypochlorite compounds such as unscented Clorox, Purex, etc., added to water intended for potable use must comply with ANSI/NSF Standard 60. The maximum application dosage recommendation for the product certified by the ANSI/NSF Standard 60 shall not be exceeded in practice.

    (4) Any products used to coat, line, seal, patch water contact surfaces or that have substantial water contact within the collection, treatment, or distribution systems must comply with the appropriate ANSI/NSF Standard 60 or 61. Application of these products must comply with recommendations contained in the product certification.

  • West Virginia TITLE 64

    LEGISLATIVE RULE

    DIVISION OF HEALTH

    DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN RESOURCES

    SERIES 77

    PUBLIC WATER SYSTEMS DESIGN STANDARDS

    ’64-77-4.  General Design Considerations.

    4.19.  Paints, Coatings, Sealers and Liners  — Paints, coatings, sealers and liners that contact raw, partially treated or potable water and are used in pipes, tanks or equipment that can transport or store water shall have third party certification of compliance with ANSI\NSF Standard 61:  Drinking Water System Components – Health Effects.

  • Wisconsin Policy Statement on Bag and Cartridge Filters for Public Water Supplies

    Predesign/Design

    1. The filter housing and bag/cartridge filter must demonstrate a filter efficiency of at least 2-log reduction in particles size 2 micron and above.  Demonstration of higher log removals may be required by the reviewing authority depending on raw water quality and other treatment steps to be employed.  The reviewing authority will decide whether or not a pilot demonstration is necessary for each installation.  This filtration efficiency demonstration may be accomplished by:
      1. Microscopic particulate analysis, including particle counting , sizing and identification, which determines occurrence and removals of micro-organisms and other particle across a filter or system under ambient raw water source condition, or when artificially challenged.
      2. Cryptosporidium particle removal evaluation in accordance with procedures specified in NSF Standard 53 or equivalent.  These evaluations must be conducted by NSF or by another third-party whose certification would be acceptable to the reviewing authority.
      3. “Protocol for Equipment Verification Testing for Physical Removal of Microbiological and Particulate Contaminants” procedure specified by the EPA/NSF Environmental Technology Verification Program.
      4. Challenge testing procedure for bag and cartridge filters presented in Chapter 8 of the Long Term  2 Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule Toolbox Guidance Manual.
      5. “Nonconsensus” live Cryptosporidium challenge studies that have been designed and carried out by a third-party agent recognized and accepted by the reviewing authority for interim evaluations.  At the present time uniform protocol procedures for live Cryptosporidium challenge studies have not been established.
      6. Methods other than these that are approved by the reviewing authority.
    1. System components such as housing, bags, cartridges, membranes, gaskets, and O-rings should be evaluated under NSF Standard 61 or equivalent, for leaching of contaminants.  Additional testing may be required by the reviewing authority.

If you manufacture, sell or distribute water treatment or distribution products in North America, your products are required to comply with NSF/ANSI Standard 61: Drinking Water System Components – Health Effects by most governmental agencies that regulate drinking water supplies. Developed by a team of scientists, industry experts, and key industry stakeholders, NSF/ANSI 61 sets health effects criteria for many water system components including gaskets and sealing solutions.  

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